Our Blog

Why a new blog for the EU4Energy Governance Project?

This new series of blog posts from the EU4Energy Governance team is our new communication platform for sharing how our work is making a real difference for the citizens of Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine. 

Our legal and regulatory work is sometimes too complex to comprehend and this blog is about communicating the benefits of energy reforms and reaching out to citizens. “Why is this reform needed?”, “What exactly will change?” and “How will this reform make my everyday life better?” - these are the types of questions we will try to answer to help citizens understand the importance of energy reforms.

We invite your feedback to our monthly blog and any ideas for future blog topics to: EU4Energy@energy-community.org

Let’s talk energy efficiency in buildings -money saved, comfort increased and health improved…

In today’s blog I would like to focus on a topic I feel passionately about: energy efficiency in buildings!  Did you know there is a strong correlation between making energy efficiency improvements in buildings and reaping improvements in the health and comfort of the people living in those buildings? It’s true; let me explain how this works and how our EU4Energy team helps make this happen.

One of the main areas of our EU4Energy work involves helping countries prepare laws and regulations to improve energy efficiency in buildings, for example, in single family homes, multi-tenant apartment buildings, retail and commercial buildings, public buildings, etc.  We are supporting Moldova and Georgia authorities to adopt a new law on energy performance in buildings and Ukraine to implement the regulations that will allow for a better implementation of the law that has already been passed.

So what changes do these laws and regulations bring?

First they create the framework for energy efficiency in buildings – meaning, we help authorities to agree on how energy efficiency in buildings is calculated and then we help them set minimum performance requirements for different types of buildings. 

Second they introduce energy performance certificates.  These certificates help buyers and sellers of property to know the energy performance of the specific property.

Third they create a system of inspections of hot water boilers that heat buildings as well as air-conditioning units to ensure they are operating efficiently.

But how does this impact citizen’s lives?

Citizens stand to benefit in many ways.  First of all, after such legislation is in place, countries will introduce energy efficiency support schemes and information campaigns to help their citizens take energy efficiency measures in their homes. Energy efficiency measures will address such problems as drafty windows and doors, poor insulation and inefficient appliances.

The first and obvious benefit of taking such actions is money savings on your energy bills as you will be using less energy.  Perhaps the not so obvious benefits are in the areas of health and comfort.

Let’s take a simple example of installing new insulation in your home. New insulation will not only help keep you warmer (or cooler) with less energy, but it will also prevent unhealthy moisture condensation (mould) and reduce emissions of pollutants, which can cause many illnesses in your home’s occupants. Another benefit of insulation is that it helps reduce noise levels and protect your privacy by keeping the sounds from inside your home from being audible outside.

Many times we do not correlate energy efficiency measures with health issues.  However, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO) guidelines for indoor air quality, it states that there is sufficient epidemiological evidence of associations between dampness or mould and asthma development or exacerbation as well as respiratory infections including coughing, wheezing and dyspnoea.  In this same document, it is clearly stated that one of the four main reasons contributing to increased exposure to dampness and mould is energy conservation measures that are not properly implemented (e.g. tightened building envelopes, ventilation deficits, improper insulation). Therefore it is clear that a well-maintained building envelope is critical to the prevention and control of excess moisture and microbial growth and this directly links to the health of the building’s occupants.

So with the new energy performance certificates in place, you will know exactly the condition of the building you are planning to rent / buy and you will be able to calculate how much you will be spending on energy bills if your rent / buy that new place and perhaps most importantly, you will know what measure you have to take to ensure how healthy you will be living in this new place!

I encourage you to start to take energy efficiency in your home seriously – you will be happy you did!

Svitlana KARPYSHYNA
Acting Head of Unit
Renewables and Energy Efficiency Expert

 

A new take on how the EU4Energy Governance project will ultimately benefit citizens

Many people ask me what the EU4Energy Governance project does to help citizens in our countries of operation.  I decided it was time to tackle this question and try to answer it in ‘human language’ rather than with the usual technical jargon.

But we would need some context first. The EU4Energy Governance project works mainly in three Eastern Partner countries: Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine that are members of the Energy Community. Our work is focused on helping governments to draft and adopt new laws and regulations in the energy sector that will ultimately help citizens in three ways:

  • Citizens will benefit from lower energy bills and those most vulnerable will be supported in paying for their energy (reduction of energy poverty);
  • Citizens will have a reliable and better quality of energy supply; and
  • Citizens will have cleaner air quality as the emissions caused by energy-related activities are reduced.

But how do the new energy laws and regulations bring about such benefits for citizens?

Sometimes to explain something complex, it is better to use an analogy that is easy to understand.  Let’s use the example of a shop.  Let’s pretend that there is only one shop in the city that is run by the government.  As there is no competition, everyone purchases goods at this shop. The service is slow, and the selection and the quality of the goods leaves a lot to be desired.

The government wants to keep its citizens happy, so it charges artificially low prices for the goods at the shop which cover only a small fraction of the real cost of operation.  The income from the shop is not sufficient to cover the cost of operation and the shop constantly borrows money from the state and creates a huge debt.  The citizens in reality are not benefiting from this shop; the quality of the goods is low and they are paying more for the goods through indirect subsidies that come from their taxes.  The shop is about to go bankrupt as it cannot sustain the huge levels of debt and it has no income to invest in new equipment and goods for the shop.

The shop can continue to operate in this manner but it will eventually go bankrupt and cause severe problems to the state finances.  Alternatively, the government who owns the shop can try to save it and reduce its debt by re-organising the shop business in the city. The government can attract multiple investors to not only invest in the one shop, but also in additional new shops, which will create competition and ultimately reduce prices for consumers as they compete for their business.  Further benefits include that citizens will have better quality of goods and the state will be able to pay off the shop debt and even generate new income for the state finances from the new shops.

So how does this all relate to energy?

Well think of the shop in the above analogy as one of the state energy monopolies. It is no longer economically viable and has huge debts that even put the state at risk.  With no investments made in their energy infrastructure for many years, the reliability and quality of the energy supply is in jeopardy for their citizens.  The solution is the same as in the analogy: there is a need for total re-organisation or reform of the sector.

It is with this ‘re-organisation’ that the EU4Energy Governance team helps governments. Our team works side-by-side with relevant state actors to develop legislation and regulations for viable energy markets that put the citizen’s concerns at the heart of the reforms.  Simply put, we support energy reforms with this vision:

Citizens have secured energy for the long-term, at affordable rates, available through multiple suppliers that they can choose from and with the right to recourse in case of unfair treatment. 

Why a new hashtag #EnergyReforms4Citizens?

As part of our ongoing focus to help create an awareness of the benefits of these energy reforms for citizens, we have adopted a new hashtag for our work: #EnergyReforms4Citizens.  This new hashtag will help us better document how the reforms are benefiting citizens and how citizens are at the heart of our work.

Why a new blog for the EU4Energy Governance team?

Sometimes our work can seem very complicated and legalistic.  We want to have an opportunity to take away the technical jargon and present our work in an easy-to-understand way. This new series of blog posts from the EU4Energy Governance team is our new communication platform for sharing the ‘human side’ of our work and the impact it is making. I hope you enjoyed this first blog post and invite your comments and questions for future blog posts. 

Svitlana KARPYSHYNA
Acting Head of Unit
Renewables and Energy Efficiency Expert

 

A new take on how the EU4Energy Governance project will ultimately benefit citizens

Many people ask me what the EU4Energy Governance project does to help citizens in our countries of operation.  I decided it was time to tackle this question and try to answer it in ‘human language’ rather than with the usual technical jargon.

But we would need some context first. The EU4Energy Governance project works mainly in three Eastern Partner countries: Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine that are members of the Energy Community. Our work is focused on helping governments to draft and adopt new laws and regulations in the energy sector that will ultimately help citizens in three ways:

  • Citizens will benefit from lower energy bills and those most vulnerable will be supported in paying for their energy (reduction of energy poverty);
  • Citizens will have a reliable and better quality of energy supply; and
  • Citizens will have cleaner air quality as the emissions caused by energy-related activities are reduced.

 

But how do the new energy laws and regulations bring about such benefits for citizens?

Sometimes to explain something complex, it is better to use an analogy that is easy to understand.  Let’s use the example of a shop.  Let’s pretend that there is only one shop in the city that is run by the government.  As there is no competition, everyone purchases goods at this shop. The service is slow, and the selection and the quality of the goods leaves a lot to be desired.

The government wants to keep its citizens happy, so it charges artificially low prices for the goods at the shop which cover only a small fraction of the real cost of operation.  The income from the shop is not sufficient to cover the cost of operation and the shop constantly borrows money from the state and creates a huge debt.  The citizens in reality are not benefiting from this shop; the quality of the goods is low and they are paying more for the goods through indirect subsidies that come from their taxes.  The shop is about to go bankrupt as it cannot sustain the huge levels of debt and it has no income to invest in new equipment and goods for the shop.

The shop can continue to operate in this manner but it will eventually go bankrupt and cause severe problems to the state finances.  Alternatively, the government who owns the shop can try to save it and reduce its debt by re-organising the shop business in the city. The government can attract multiple investors to not only invest in the one shop, but also in additional new shops, which will create competition and ultimately reduce prices for consumers as they compete for their business.  Further benefits include that citizens will have better quality of goods and the state will be able to pay off the shop debt and even generate new income for the state finances from the new shops.

So how does this all relate to energy?

Well think of the shop in the above analogy as one of the state energy monopolies. It is no longer economically viable and has huge debts that even put the state at risk.  With no investments made in their energy infrastructure for many years, the reliability and quality of the energy supply is in jeopardy for their citizens.  The solution is the same as in the analogy: there is a need for total re-organisation or reform of the sector.

It is with this ‘re-organisation’ that the EU4Energy Governance team helps governments. Our team works side-by-side with relevant state actors to develop legislation and regulations for viable energy markets that put the citizen’s concerns at the heart of the reforms.  Simply put, we support energy reforms with this vision:

Citizens have secured energy for the long-term, at affordable rates, available through multiple suppliers that they can choose from and with the right to recourse in case of unfair treatment. 

Why a new hashtag #EnergyReforms4Citizens?

As part of our ongoing focus to help create an awareness of the benefits of these energy reforms for citizens, we have adopted a new hashtag for our work: #EnergyReforms4Citizens.  This new hashtag will help us better document how the reforms are benefiting citizens and how citizens are at the heart of our work.

Why a new blog for the EU4Energy Governance team?

Sometimes our work can seem very complicated and legalistic.  We want to have an opportunity to take away the technical jargon and present our work in an easy-to-understand way. This new series of blog posts from the EU4Energy Governance team is our new communication platform for sharing the ‘human side’ of our work and the impact it is making. I hope you enjoyed this first blog post and invite your comments and questions for future blog posts. 

Svitlana KARPYSHYNA
Deputy Head of Unit
Renewables and Energy Efficiency Expert

 

A new take on how the EU4Energy Governance project will ultimately benefit citizens

Many people ask me what the EU4Energy Governance project does to help citizens in our countries of operation.  I decided it was time to tackle this question and try to answer it in ‘human language’ rather than with the usual technical jargon.

But we would need some context first. The EU4Energy Governance project works mainly in three Eastern Partner countries: Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine that are members of the Energy Community. Our work is focused on helping governments to draft and adopt new laws and regulations in the energy sector that will ultimately help citizens in three ways:

  • Citizens will benefit from lower energy bills and those most vulnerable will be supported in paying for their energy (reduction of energy poverty);
  • Citizens will have a reliable and better quality of energy supply; and
  • Citizens will have cleaner air quality as the emissions caused by energy-related activities are reduced.

 

But how do the new energy laws and regulations bring about such benefits for citizens?

Sometimes to explain something complex, it is better to use an analogy that is easy to understand.  Let’s use the example of a shop.  Let’s pretend that there is only one shop in the city that is run by the government.  As there is no competition, everyone purchases goods at this shop. The service is slow, and the selection and the quality of the goods leaves a lot to be desired.

The government wants to keep its citizens happy, so it charges artificially low prices for the goods at the shop which cover only a small fraction of the real cost of operation.  The income from the shop is not sufficient to cover the cost of operation and the shop constantly borrows money from the state and creates a huge debt.  The citizens in reality are not benefiting from this shop; the quality of the goods is low and they are paying more for the goods through indirect subsidies that come from their taxes.  The shop is about to go bankrupt as it cannot sustain the huge levels of debt and it has no income to invest in new equipment and goods for the shop.

The shop can continue to operate in this manner but it will eventually go bankrupt and cause severe problems to the state finances.  Alternatively, the government who owns the shop can try to save it and reduce its debt by re-organising the shop business in the city. The government can attract multiple investors to not only invest in the one shop, but also in additional new shops, which will create competition and ultimately reduce prices for consumers as they compete for their business.  Further benefits include that citizens will have better quality of goods and the state will be able to pay off the shop debt and even generate new income for the state finances from the new shops.

So how does this all relate to energy?

Well think of the shop in the above analogy as one of the state energy monopolies. It is no longer economically viable and has huge debts that even put the state at risk.  With no investments made in their energy infrastructure for many years, the reliability and quality of the energy supply is in jeopardy for their citizens.  The solution is the same as in the analogy: there is a need for total re-organisation or reform of the sector.

It is with this ‘re-organisation’ that the EU4Energy Governance team helps governments. Our team works side-by-side with relevant state actors to develop legislation and regulations for viable energy markets that put the citizen’s concerns at the heart of the reforms.  Simply put, we support energy reforms with this vision:

Citizens have secured energy for the long-term, at affordable rates, available through multiple suppliers that they can choose from and with the right to recourse in case of unfair treatment. 

Why a new hashtag #EnergyReforms4Citizens?

As part of our ongoing focus to help create an awareness of the benefits of these energy reforms for citizens, we have adopted a new hashtag for our work: #EnergyReforms4Citizens.  This new hashtag will help us better document how the reforms are benefiting citizens and how citizens are at the heart of our work.

Why a new blog for the EU4Energy Governance team?

Sometimes our work can seem very complicated and legalistic.  We want to have an opportunity to take away the technical jargon and present our work in an easy-to-understand way. This new series of blog posts from the EU4Energy Governance team is our new communication platform for sharing the ‘human side’ of our work and the impact it is making. I hope you enjoyed this first blog post and invite your comments and questions for future blog posts. 

Svitlana KARPYSHYNA
Deputy Head of Unit
Renewables and Energy Efficiency Expert

 

A new take on how the EU4Energy Governance project will ultimately benefit citizens

Many people ask me what the EU4Energy Governance project does to help citizens in our countries of operation.  I decided it was time to tackle this question and try to answer it in ‘human language’ rather than with the usual technical jargon.

But we would need some context first. The EU4Energy Governance project works mainly in three Eastern Partner countries: Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine that are members of the Energy Community. Our work is focused on helping governments to draft and adopt new laws and regulations in the energy sector that will ultimately help citizens in three ways:

  • Citizens will benefit from lower energy bills and those most vulnerable will be supported in paying for their energy (reduction of energy poverty);
  • Citizens will have a reliable and better quality of energy supply; and
  • Citizens will have cleaner air quality as the emissions caused by energy-related activities are reduced.

 

But how do the new energy laws and regulations bring about such benefits for citizens?

Sometimes to explain something complex, it is better to use an analogy that is easy to understand.  Let’s use the example of a shop.  Let’s pretend that there is only one shop in the city that is run by the government.  As there is no competition, everyone purchases goods at this shop. The service is slow, and the selection and the quality of the goods leaves a lot to be desired.

The government wants to keep its citizens happy, so it charges artificially low prices for the goods at the shop which cover only a small fraction of the real cost of operation.  The income from the shop is not sufficient to cover the cost of operation and the shop constantly borrows money from the state and creates a huge debt.  The citizens in reality are not benefiting from this shop; the quality of the goods is low and they are paying more for the goods through indirect subsidies that come from their taxes.  The shop is about to go bankrupt as it cannot sustain the huge levels of debt and it has no income to invest in new equipment and goods for the shop.

The shop can continue to operate in this manner but it will eventually go bankrupt and cause severe problems to the state finances.  Alternatively, the government who owns the shop can try to save it and reduce its debt by re-organising the shop business in the city. The government can attract multiple investors to not only invest in the one shop, but also in additional new shops, which will create competition and ultimately reduce prices for consumers as they compete for their business.  Further benefits include that citizens will have better quality of goods and the state will be able to pay off the shop debt and even generate new income for the state finances from the new shops.

So how does this all relate to energy?

Well think of the shop in the above analogy as one of the state energy monopolies. It is no longer economically viable and has huge debts that even put the state at risk.  With no investments made in their energy infrastructure for many years, the reliability and quality of the energy supply is in jeopardy for their citizens.  The solution is the same as in the analogy: there is a need for total re-organisation or reform of the sector.

It is with this ‘re-organisation’ that the EU4Energy Governance team helps governments. Our team works side-by-side with relevant state actors to develop legislation and regulations for viable energy markets that put the citizen’s concerns at the heart of the reforms.  Simply put, we support energy reforms with this vision:

Citizens have secured energy for the long-term, at affordable rates, available through multiple suppliers that they can choose from and with the right to recourse in case of unfair treatment. 

Why a new hashtag #EnergyReforms4Citizens?

As part of our ongoing focus to help create an awareness of the benefits of these energy reforms for citizens, we have adopted a new hashtag for our work: #EnergyReforms4Citizens.  This new hashtag will help us better document how the reforms are benefiting citizens and how citizens are at the heart of our work.

Why a new blog for the EU4Energy Governance team?

Sometimes our work can seem very complicated and legalistic.  We want to have an opportunity to take away the technical jargon and present our work in an easy-to-understand way. This new series of blog posts from the EU4Energy Governance team is our new communication platform for sharing the ‘human side’ of our work and the impact it is making. I hope you enjoyed this first blog post and invite your comments and questions for future blog posts. 

Svitlana KARPYSHYNA
Deputy Head of Unit
Renewables and Energy Efficiency Expert

 

Mr. Alessandro Ischia

 

Senior Expert - Gas Department Energie-Control (Austria)

Download CV


A new take on how the EU4Energy Governance project will ultimately benefit citizens

Many people ask me what the EU4Energy Governance project does to help citizens in our countries of operation.  I decided it was time to tackle this question and try to answer it in ‘human language’ rather than with the usual technical jargon.

But we would need some context first. The EU4Energy Governance project works mainly in three Eastern Partner countries: Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine that are members of the Energy Community. Our work is focused on helping governments to draft and adopt new laws and regulations in the energy sector that will ultimately help citizens in three ways:

•             Citizens will benefit from lower energy bills and those most vulnerable will be supported in paying for their energy (reduction of energy poverty);

•             Citizens will have a reliable and better quality of energy supply; and

•             Citizens will have cleaner air quality as the emissions caused by energy-related activities are reduced.

But how do the new energy laws and regulations bring about such benefits for citizens?

Sometimes to explain something complex, it is better to use an analogy that is easy to understand.  Let’s use the example of a shop.  Let’s pretend that there is only one shop in the city that is run by the government.  As there is no competition, everyone purchases goods at this shop. The service is slow, and the selection and the quality of the goods leaves a lot to be desired.

The government wants to keep its citizens happy, so it charges artificially low prices for the goods at the shop which cover only a small fraction of the real cost of operation.  The income from the shop is not sufficient to cover the cost of operation and the shop constantly borrows money from the state and creates a huge debt.  The citizens in reality are not benefiting from this shop; the quality of the goods is low and they are paying more for the goods through indirect subsidies that come from their taxes.  The shop is about to go bankrupt as it cannot sustain the huge levels of debt and it has no income to invest in new equipment and goods for the shop.

The shop can continue to operate in this manner but it will eventually go bankrupt and cause severe problems to the state finances.  Alternatively, the government who owns the shop can try to save it and reduce its debt by re-organising the shop business in the city. The government can attract multiple investors to not only invest in the one shop, but also in additional new shops, which will create competition and ultimately reduce prices for consumers as they compete for their business.  Further benefits include that citizens will have better quality of goods and the state will be able to pay off the shop debt and even generate new income for the state finances from the new shops.

So how does this all relate to energy?

Well think of the shop in the above analogy as one of the state energy monopolies. It is no longer economically viable and has huge debts that even put the state at risk.  With no investments made in their energy infrastructure for many years, the reliability and quality of the energy supply is in jeopardy for their citizens.  The solution is the same as in the analogy: there is a need for total re-organisation or reform of the sector.

It is with this ‘re-organisation’ that the EU4Energy Governance team helps governments. Our team works side-by-side with relevant state actors to develop legislation and regulations for viable energy markets that put the citizen’s concerns at the heart of the reforms.  Simply put, we support energy reforms with this vision:

Citizens have secured energy for the long-term, at affordable rates, available through multiple suppliers that they can choose from and with the right to recourse in case of unfair treatment. 

Why a new hashtag #EnergyReforms4Citizens?

As part of our ongoing focus to help create an awareness of the benefits of these energy reforms for citizens, we have adopted a new hashtag for our work: #EnergyReforms4Citizens.  This new hashtag will help us to better document how the reforms are benefitting citizens and how citizens are at the heart of our work.

Why a new blog for the EU4Energy Governance team?

Sometimes our work can seem very complicated and legalistic.  We want to have an opportunity to take away the technical jargon and present our work in an easy-to-understand way. This new series of blog posts from the EU4Energy Governance team is our new communication platform for sharing the ‘human side’ of our work and the impact it is making. I hope you enjoyed this first blog post and invite your comments and questions for future blog posts. 

Svitlana KARPYSHYNA
Deputy Head of Unit
Renewables and Energy Efficiency Expert 

 

Mr. Bernhard Maier 

Associate Squire Patton Boggs, Appointment Attorney General’s C Panel of Junior Counsel to the Crown for Public International Law (UK)

Download CV

 

Mr. Florian Neumayr

 

HCo-managing partner bpv Hügel Rechtsanwälte OEG (Austria)


Download CV

Ms. Maryna Hritsyshyna

 

Manager of Legal department WIND POWER LLC (Ukraine) 

Download CV

Ms. Irina Paliashvili 

 

Manager Partner RULG-UKRAINIAN Legal Group (USA) 

Download CV

Mr. Yaroslav Petrov

 

Counsel Asters law firm (Ukraine) 

Download CV

Mr. Andreas Pointvogl

 

Project Manager BLUBERRIES GmbH (Germany)

Download CV

Mr. Martin Svatos

 

Mediator / Arbitrator FORARB, Partner (Czech Republic)


Download CV

 

Ms. Svitlana Teush

 

Of Counsel of Redcliffe Partners law firm (former Clifford Chance Ukraine)


Download CV

Mr. Michael Thomadakis 

 

Director, Grant Thornton S.A., Athens (Greece) 


Download CV

Ms. Mariya Tsocheva

 

Senior Legal Counsel (Bulgaria)


Download CV

Mr. Herman Verbist

 

Attorney-at-Law, Member of Ghent and Brussels Bar (Belgium)

Download CV

 

Ms. Vanesa Vujanic

 

Attorney-at-Law, Partner Vujanic Law Office (Croatia)

Download CV

Mr. Okan Yardimci

 

Senior Energy Expert Energy Market Regulatory Authority, Ankara (Turkey) 

 
Download CV

Mr. Paul C. Deemer

Partner Of Counsel at Vinson & Elkins RLLP (UK)

Download CV

Ms. Anna De Luca

Attorney at law and (contract) professor at Università Bocconi (Italy)

Download CV

 

Mr. Nikos Lavranos

 

Legal advisor & dispute resolution consultant, NL-investment consulting.com, Haarlem (Netherlands) 

Download CV

Mr. Moritz Keller

 

Head of arbitration practice in Vienna at Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer (Austria)

Download CV
 

Ms. Miryan Weichselbaum-Gharibo

 

International Commercial Mediator, Partner at Let's Agree (Austria)
 

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